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When it comes to Tombstone, there is no lack of colorful Local History to immerse oneself in.

Watch these 6 videos, click on a title or browse below the list for articles that might interest you.

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Tombstone:Tourism or Legend? - Tombstone is both an historic cowboy, mining town and a tourist town. Straddling the two is not easy.
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A Death In Charleston, Arizona Territory

Tombstone Deputy Sheriff Billy Breakenridge

M. Robert Peel Born: Wednesday, May 31, 1854 Died: Saturday, March 25, 1882 (Charleston, Arizona) – gunshot through the heart Interred: Boothill Graveyard, Tombstone, Cochise County, Arizona Occupation: Mineral Surveyor, Mining Engineer Charleston, A.T. (Arizona Territory) was an important Old West town because it was home to the mill workers … Continue reading

A Good Day In Tombstone: Dr. Jay’s Tombstone Walking Tour

Dr. Jay standing beside the large plaque that about the Gunfight At The OK Corral.

Recently we enjoyed another day trip to Tombstone. When out-of-town guests are planning their first visit to Tombstone, we always recommend they take Dr. Jay’s Tombstone Walking Tour. His tours are entertaining, enlightening, and the best way to appreciate the real history of the most famous town in the Old West. While Dr. Jay’s Walking […]

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A Trip to the Clanton Ranch

Clanton Ranch group

On a sunny day in mid-October with Helldorado Days in full swing, Ms. Rosemary and Ms. Karen, headed for the San Pedro River to learn about the Clanton Ranch. Helldorado Days has occurred every year in Tombstone at this time for over 85 years, with parties and parades.  Still, it was a … Continue reading

Bird Cage Theater – Tombstone

Bill Hunley is the manager of the Bird Cage Theater, Tombstone’s most notorious saloon, gambling hall, and house of ill-repute. It’s been in his family since the 1930’s. The Bird Cage is now a museum, but what an extraordinary museum it is. Watch the video to get a glimpse.

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Boothill Graveyard: Tombstone, AZ

Tombstone Boothill

Visiting Tombstone’s Boothill Graveyard is free. After all, it’s a public cemetery. But it takes considerable willpower not to stop at the gift shop on the way out and buy a souvenir. We have several. Newman (Old Man) Clanton was born in 1816 and was killed by Mexican troops in … Continue reading

Colonel William C. Greene and a Death in the Family

William Cornell Greene

William C. Greene was born in Wisconsin in 1852 (or maybe 53). Greene spent his most productive years in Sonora, Mexico. However, we can reasonably conclude that, between 1890 and 1910, he was one of the richest and most influential men in Cochise County, Arizona Territory. Most folks referred to … Continue reading

Exploring the Millville Ruins with the FSPR

Millville Ruins

Ever since Jim and I have been travelling to and from Tombstone I have been curious about the Millville Ruins, stone structures outside of Tombstone about 8 miles. They sit on the side of a hill facing the San Pedro River to the west as it meanders northward. My opportunity to … Continue reading

Fairbank: A Ghost Town Slideshow

Fairbank Picnic

Fairbank ghost town (aka Fairbank Historic Townsite) is about a 20 minute drive from Tombstone. It is located along the San Pedro River within the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area. Fairbank was established in 1881 as a depot for the railroad. The town was named for N.K. Fairbank, one … Continue reading

Good Enough Mine Tour

A joke around Tombstone goes like this. “Tombstone was built on mediocrity. For example, we have a corral that’s just OK; and a mine that’s barely good enough.” Our Good Enough Mine Tour was more than just “good enough”. The mine is a constant 65 degrees, a cooling retreat in … Continue reading

How Two Historic Tucson Neighborhoods Got Their Names

John "Pie" Allen

In the mid-19th century, in the remote southwest desert that was Arizona Territory, there were not many ways to earn a fortune. Life was mostly a struggle just to survive, let alone prosper. In the early 1850’s, 10’s of thousands of young men from the eastern United States, Midwest, and … Continue reading

John Clum: The Only Man To Ever Capture Geronimo!

Wyatt Earp; John Clum. Alaska 1920's.

John Clum became one of those legendary characters from Tombstone’s infamous past. His life before Tombstone is just as interesting, but that story is known only to a few. He was born in upstate New York in 1851 and attended a military academy before enrolling at Rutgers College where he … Continue reading

Katie Elder,a.k.a. Big Nose Kate, Her True Story

Faye Dunaway as Katie Elder in the 1971 movie "Doc".

Katie Elder was more, much more, than the title character in John Wayne’s 1965 western, “The Sons of
Katie Elder,” She was more than the portrayal by Faye Dunaway in the 1971 film “Doc.” Katie Elder was
a real person, whose background was perhaps more plaid than checkered. For one thing, there were all
those names.

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Murdered On The Streets Of Tombstone by Joyce Aros

Murdered On The Streets Of Tombstone

In early November 2016, I had the pleasure of sitting in the master bedroom of the main house of the Empire Ranch across from author Joyce Aros. It was the Annual Fall Roundup fundraiser and we were both at the authors’ table to sell our respective books: Murdered on the … Continue reading

Southern Arizona Ghost Town Tour: A Slideshow!

Gleeson Jail

In the Fall of 2014, Southern Arizona Guide became more than just a website with all of its Dining & Lodging Reviews, Local History, and recommended Things To See and Do. We started offering tours to some of the most interesting and historical places in the American Southwest. This slideshow … Continue reading

The Education of a Notorious Gambler & Gunman!

Sophie Walton

Sophie Walton was born a slave on a Georgia plantation in 1856. Her master was a Mr. Walton. In 1864, Mr. Walton could no longer keep his slaves. The Union Army had freed them and he could not afford to pay for their labor. To his credit, Mr. Walton did … Continue reading

The Train To Tombstone: Arizona Territory, 1903.

TOMBSTONE’S RAILROAD CENTENNIAL reprinted with permission from Tombstone Times. by Larry Jensen & Ray Madzia Picture the day. Feel the event. The Railroad was coming to Tombstone!!!! It had been nearly 25 years that folks had been arriving in Tombstone, but not by rail. The railroad had not laid tracks … Continue reading

Tombstone Boothill Graveyard: How They Lived; How They Died.

China Mary Tombstone

In 1880, old age began about 40, the average life expectancy of a U.S. citizen. Life was hard, good nutrition & effective medical treatment were scarce. By age 40, most people, particularly women, were simply worn out. Between 1879 and 1884, about 300 people were buried in the Tombstone Boothill … Continue reading

Tombstone Bordello Bed & Breakfast

I must say, it was a pleasant experience. Not because the Bordello is fancy. It’s not. But the bed was comfortable, the garden and pool area most pleasant. And the hostess, Ms. Lynda, a delight.
The Tombstone Bordello has another advantage. It’s only a five minute walk to THE MAIN EVENT – the OK Corral, Big Nose Kate’s, Crystal Palace, Bird Cage Theater, and the Old Courthouse Museum.

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Tombstone Historic Home Tour 2014: A Slideshow!

Tombstone Cameo Lady

Saturday, December 6, 2014 was the first Tombstone Historic Home Tour. The event was sponsored by The Cameo Ladies of Tombstone, A.T. and Tombstone Forward. The tour was an especially rich experience because these were mostly homes from the historic era and beautifully furnished in period from 1879 to the … Continue reading

Tombstone Mines: How Much Were They Really Worth?

(Rt to Lt) Richard (Dick) Gird; Al Schieffelin; Ed Schieffelin,

Did you ever wonder what was the value of $1,000 U.S. Dollars back through the ages? For example, when partners Ed Schieffelin & his brother Al Schieffelin sold their shares in their Tombstone mines for $600,000 in 1880, how much was that worth in 2014 dollars? I knew the sale … Continue reading

Tombstone: The Town Too Tough To Die Almost Did

By the 1930’s, Tombstone was dying. The mining boomtown of the 1880’s was long gone. In 1882, Tombstone residents numbered between 6,000 and 7,000. By the time these photographs were taken, the nation was deep in the Great Depression, and Tombstone was almost a ghost town.

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Tour Pearce AZ: A (Sometimes Lively) Ghost Town!

Ms. Karen feeds goats at Marcia's Garden

Southern Arizona Guide is leading a tour to the ghost town of Pearce, AZ the Saturday after Thanksgiving. On our travels we will enjoy wine tasting at Golden Rule Vineyards and lunch & libations at an Old West saloon in beautiful Texas Canyon. You are welcome to join us. ********************* … Continue reading

World’s Largest Rose, the Lady Banksiae

Lady Banks Rose

Reportedly the world’s largest single rose bush lives in Tombstone, Arizona at the Rose Tree Museum, 4th and Toughnut. Commonly called the Lady Banks, the “lady banksiae” a white rose, came from Scotland in 1885. It covers over 8000 square feet. It blooms in the early spring and is thornless. … Continue reading

Wyatt Earp and the Earp Vendetta Ride

Wyatt and Doc

The Gunfight at the OK Corral in Tombstone was only the beginning of the murderous conflict between Wyatt Earp, his brothers and their friends, and the outlaw gang known as ‘The Cowboys’. ‘The Cowboys’ were about two-dozen hard riding, hard drinking ranchers and rustlers, their hired hands and gunslingers. Most … Continue reading

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