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Old West StagecoachThe more I delve into the history of Tucson and Southern Arizona, the more fascinated I become with this place I call home. The Old West really comes to life when I visit historic places, such as Fort Bowie, AND know the significance of what happened there back in the day.

Below you will find my factual accounts of the people, both Native Americans and Anglo-Americans, who struggled to make their way in a mostly harsh and lawless land. Here you will meet the Apache leaders who led their brave and resourceful people against the horde of Anglo invaders. You will meet Texas John Slaughter, the sheriff who cleaned up Cochise County after the Earps left Arizona. You will meet Larcena Pennington, a young woman who was kidnapped by Apaches, then repeatedly stabbed and left for dead.

Through my accounts, you will discover the many ghost towns of Southern Arizona, such as Ruby and Fairbank, that are worth a good walkabout. And you will discover towns, such as Tombstone, that should be ghosts, but survived to the present to relive those bygone days.

I hope you enjoy reading about them as much as I enjoyed researching and writing about them.

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Murdered On The Streets Of Tombstone by Joyce Aros

Murdered On The Streets Of Tombstone

In early November 2016, I had the pleasure of sitting in the master bedroom of the main house of the Empire Ranch across from author Joyce Aros. It was the Annual Fall Roundup fundraiser and we were both at the authors’ table to sell our respective books: Murdered on the … Continue reading

Empire Ranch Fall Roundup

Empire Ranch Fall Roundup 2013

This year’s Empire Ranch Fall Roundup & Open House is Saturday, November 5th. The day-long Roundup will feature presentations and demonstrations about cowboy life on the Ranch and showcase Western traditions, skills, music, and food. Ms. Karen & I went last year and thoroughly enjoyed ourselves. This is a great … Continue reading

A Trip to the Clanton Ranch

Clanton Ranch group

On a sunny day in mid-October with Helldorado Days in full swing, Ms. Rosemary and Ms. Karen, headed for the San Pedro River to learn about the Clanton Ranch. Helldorado Days has occurred every year in Tombstone at this time for over 85 years, with parties and parades.  Still, it was a … Continue reading

The Wrath of Cochise, by Terry Mort: A Book Review

General George Armstrong Custer

Most Americans know at least a little about Custer’s Last Stand, also known as the Battle of the Little Bighorn. The incident has an epic quality worthy of Homer’s Illiad or Virgil’s Aeneid. The battle took place on June 25th & 26th, 1876 between the combined forces of the Lakoda, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho tribes […]

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Colonel William C. Greene and a Death in the Family

William Cornell Greene

William C. Greene was born in Wisconsin in 1852 (or maybe 53). Greene spent his most productive years in Sonora, Mexico. However, we can reasonably conclude that, between 1890 and 1910, he was one of the richest and most influential men in Cochise County, Arizona Territory. Most folks referred to … Continue reading

John Clum: The Only Man To Ever Capture Geronimo!

Wyatt Earp; John Clum. Alaska 1920's.

John Clum became one of those legendary characters from Tombstone’s infamous past. His life before Tombstone is just as interesting, but that story is known only to a few. He was born in upstate New York in 1851 and attended a military academy before enrolling at Rutgers College where he … Continue reading

The Train To Tombstone: Arizona Territory, 1903.

TOMBSTONE’S RAILROAD CENTENNIAL reprinted with permission from Tombstone Times. by Larry Jensen & Ray Madzia Picture the day. Feel the event. The Railroad was coming to Tombstone!!!! It had been nearly 25 years that folks had been arriving in Tombstone, but not by rail. The railroad had not laid tracks … Continue reading

Adventures In Apache Country: An (1864) Tour Through Arizona

Tucson Arizona Territory ca. 1864.

In the 1850’s, Southern Arizona was undeveloped. Tucson was a small, dirty Mexican village with perhaps 300 poor souls. The Spanish abandoned their Presidio at Tubac because of relentless Apache attacks and had established El Presidio de Tucson in 1775. The Mexicans had taken over the fort following Mexico’s independence … Continue reading