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Old West StagecoachThe more I delve into the history of Tucson and Southern Arizona, the more fascinated I become with this place I call home. The Old West really comes to life when I visit historic places, such as Fort Bowie, AND know the significance of what happened there back in the day.

Below you will find my factual accounts of the people, both Native Americans and Anglo-Americans, who struggled to make their way in a mostly harsh and lawless land. Here you will meet the Apache leaders who led their brave and resourceful people against the horde of Anglo invaders. You will meet Texas John Slaughter, the sheriff who cleaned up Cochise County after the Earps left Arizona. You will meet Larcena Pennington, a young woman who was kidnapped by Apaches, then repeatedly stabbed and left for dead.

Through my accounts, you will discover the many ghost towns of Southern Arizona, such as Ruby and Fairbank, that are worth a good walkabout. And you will discover towns, such as Tombstone, that should be ghosts, but survived to the present to relive those bygone days.

I hope you enjoy reading about them as much as I enjoyed researching and writing about them.

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The Train To Tombstone: Arizona Territory, 1903.

Tombstone Train 1903

TOMBSTONE’S RAILROAD CENTENNIAL reprinted with permission from Tombstone Times. by Larry Jensen & Ray Madzia Picture the day. Feel the event. The Railroad was coming to Tombstone!!!! It had been nearly 25 years that folks had been arriving in Tombstone, but not by rail. The railroad had not laid tracks … Continue reading

Adventures In Apache Country: An (1864) Tour Through Arizona

Tucson Arizona Territory ca. 1864.

In the 1850’s, Southern Arizona was undeveloped. Tucson was a small, dirty Mexican village with perhaps 300 poor souls. The Spanish abandoned their Presidio at Tubac because of relentless Apache attacks and had established El Presidio de Tucson in 1775. The Mexicans had taken over the fort following Mexico’s independence … Continue reading

Who Killed Johnny Ringo?

Johnny Ringo's Grave

Almost everything we “know” about the outlaw gunman Johnny Ringo is either factually inaccurate, unsubstantiated hearsay, or intentional embellishment by authors to sell their books and magazine articles. Here is what we know with a reasonable degree of certitude. We know he was born in Indiana in 1850 and died … Continue reading

Fort Bayard, New Mexico: A Splendid History!

Fort Bayard New Mexico

Fort Bayard very near Silver City, New Mexico was one of many forts established by the U.S. Army to subdue the Apaches who threatened both Anglo-American and Mexican-American settlers, their crops and their herds. To be more specific, Fort Bayard was created by Company B of the 125th U.S. Colored … Continue reading

Steins: A Ghost Town With Stories To Tell

Steins ghost town New Mexico

Steins (pronounced Steens) is a New Mexico ghost town. It is easy to get to. Driving east from Tucson, stay on the I-10 for a few minutes past the New Mexico border and take the Steins off ramp. What remains of the town is on the north side of the … Continue reading

Pinos Altos: A New Mexico Ghost Town

Pinos Altos Opera House

May 2016. One of our day trips while staying in Silver City New Mexico was to the once thriving mining town of Pinos Altos (Spanish for Tall Pines). In 1860, three prospectors stopped for a drink at Bear Creek 7 miles north of Silver City and discovered gold. Soon, 700 … Continue reading

Silver City, New Mexico: A Walk About Town!

Silver City Overview

Silver City was a mining town, as were most early towns in Southern Arizona and New Mexico. In fact, Silver City most resembles Bisbee, Arizona. Both were built on hills over 5,000′ elevation. Both have many stately structures built in the late 19th and early 20th century. Both now have … Continue reading