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Old West StagecoachThe more I delve into the history of Tucson and Southern Arizona, the more fascinated I become with this place I call home. The Old West really comes to life when I visit historic places, such as Fort Bowie, AND know the significance of what happened there back in the day.

Below you will find my factual accounts of the people, both Native Americans and Anglo-Americans, who struggled to make their way in a mostly harsh and lawless land. Here you will meet the Apache leaders who led their brave and resourceful people against the horde of Anglo invaders. You will meet Texas John Slaughter, the sheriff who cleaned up Cochise County after the Earps left Arizona. You will meet Larcena Pennington, a young woman who was kidnapped by Apaches, then repeatedly stabbed and left for dead.

Through my accounts, you will discover the many ghost towns of Southern Arizona, such as Ruby and Fairbank, that are worth a good walkabout. And you will discover towns, such as Tombstone, that should be ghosts, but survived to the present to relive those bygone days.

I hope you enjoy reading about them as much as I enjoyed researching and writing about them.

Ghost Town Cemeteries in Southern Arizona

Monument Atop Poston Butte Near Florence, AZ.

I love to wander around old cemeteries. They give us a sense of place. Many memories are hidden there, many stories to be told. Isn’t the cliche, “If only the dead could talk”? Old cemeteries go hand in hand with Ghost Towns. Sometimes the Ghost Town is completely gone, no … Continue reading

How Two Historic Tucson Neighborhoods Got Their Names

John "Pie" Allen

In the mid-19th century, in the remote southwest desert that was Arizona Territory, there were not many ways to earn a fortune. Life was mostly a struggle just to survive, let alone prosper. In the early 1850’s, 10’s of thousands of young men from the eastern United States, Midwest, and … Continue reading

Tombstone Mines: How Much Were They Really Worth?

(Rt to Lt) Richard (Dick) Gird; Al Schieffelin; Ed Schieffelin,

Did you ever wonder what was the value of $1,000 U.S. Dollars back through the ages? For example, when partners Ed Schieffelin & his brother Al Schieffelin sold their shares in their Tombstone mines for $600,000 in 1880, how much was that worth in 2014 dollars? I knew the sale … Continue reading

A Death In Charleston, Arizona Territory

Tombstone Deputy Sheriff Billy Breakenridge

M. Robert Peel Born: Wednesday, May 31, 1854 Died: Saturday, March 25, 1882 (Charleston, Arizona) – gunshot through the heart Interred: Boothill Graveyard, Tombstone, Cochise County, Arizona Occupation: Mineral Surveyor, Mining Engineer Charleston, A.T. (Arizona Territory) was an important Old West town because it was home to the mill workers … Continue reading

Southern Arizona Ghost Town Tour: A Slideshow!

Gleeson Jail

In the Fall of 2014, Southern Arizona Guide became more than just a website with all of its Dining & Lodging Reviews, Local History, and recommended Things To See and Do. We started offering tours to some of the most interesting and historical places in the American Southwest. This slideshow … Continue reading

Directions To Dragoon Springs Stage Station

Dragoon Springs Stage Station sign

Note: A high-clearance vehicle is advised. From Downtown Tucson, take I-10 east about an hour and exit Dragoon Road (Exit 318) Turn right (south) on Dragoon Road; continue 3.5 miles (past the entrance of the Amerind) to the town of Dragoon. You will cross several cattle guards. If you come … Continue reading

Empire Ranch Fall Roundup Is Saturday November 1st!

This year’s Empire Ranch Fall Roundup & Open House is Saturday, November 1st. The day-long Roundup will feature presentations and demonstrations about cowboy life on the Ranch and showcase Western traditions, skills, music, and food. Ms. Karen & I went last year and thoroughly enjoyed ourselves. This is a great … Continue reading

Apache May: An Indian Girl On The Slaughter Ranch

This is the dress and vest Apache May wore when Sheriff John Slaughter discovered her.

“Texas” John Slaughter was the sheriff who cleaned up Cochise County after the Earp Brothers and Doc Holliday left Arizona. He was as tough as they come and, among the outlaw class, earned the moniker “that wicked little gringo”. As despised and feared as he was by the outlaws, he … Continue reading