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Greenlee County is home of Duncan, Clifton, Morenci and the largest open pit mine in the Western Hemisphere. No matter what your point of view this place will amaze you. Everyone needs copper and the history here is fascinating.

Greenlee County

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Guided Tours of Tucson and Southern Arizona

Santa Cruz River Valley Tour at Tumacacori

Click HERE for schedule of upcoming tours and ticket purchases. What People Are Saying About Our Guided Tours Jim, I want to take a moment to thank you on behalf of all five of us. We really enjoyed being a part of the first wine tasting tour that you and … Continue reading

Historic Downtown Tucson: A Collection of Picture Postcards

Tucson, Arizona: 2013.

As a “city”, Tucson really came into its own in the first decade of the 20th century, even though the city was legally incorporated in 1877. It never amounted to anything of importance until the Southern Pacific Railroad arrived in 1880. The railroad connected Tucson to the outside world. It brought hardware, lumber, and fresh produce at affordable prices. Even today, you can see how the architecture of the city changed after the arrival of the railroad. 

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Tucson Attractions: The Ones Few People Know About!

Road to Cave Creek Canyon

Locals are generally familiar with our major Tucson and Southern Arizona attractions, such as our fantastic Desert Museum & the beautiful gardens of Tohono Chul Park. You can find the ones we recommend under “Attractions” in the Main Menu. However, very few locals know about or have been to the … Continue reading

Tohono Chul Map

Tohono Chul Park: Spring Wildflowers.

Tohono Chul is a peaceful garden oasis in the midst of city and suburb. You can stroll along winding paths through several different types of gardens with hundreds of native plant species, as well as many birds, including hummers.

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Pima Air and Space Museum Map

Pima Air and Space Museum

Here is the history of manned flight. Pima Air and Space Museum has over 300 historic aircraft on exhibit, including the Blackbird, a 1950’s design that still holds the speed record for coast to coast flight: imagine going from New York to Los Angeles in one hour.

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Mt. Lemmon Map

mt lemmon snow

Mt. Lemmon is a recreational paradise in the Santa Catalina Mountains and the Coronado National Forest. It is 9,157 feet (2,791 m) above sea-level, and receives approximately 180 inches of snow annually. A perfect place for skiing in the winter or camping in the summer, it also has observatories that you can view through a telescope, winter or summer. Other activities are hiking, biking and hanging out to cool off in the summer.

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San Xavier del Bac Map

Mission San Xavier del Bac

Mission San Xavier del Bac is about 15 minutes south of downtown Tucson. It is the finest example of Spanish mission architecture anywhere. It was built in the late 18th century and is today both an important piece of Baja Arizona history and an active Roman Catholic church serving the Tohono O’odham people.

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Look to the Mountains: A History of Mt. Lemmon

Rose Canyon Lake on the way to Summerhaven and Ski Valley near the summit of Mt. Lemmon.

I found this book on the history of Mt. Lemmon at the Palisades Ranger Station on Mt. Lemmon last summer and have been trying to get time to read it ever since. The complete title is: Look to the Mountains: An in-depth look into the lives and times of the people … Continue reading

Tucson Folk Festival 2016

Old couple dancing at Tucson Folk Festival 2016

I am an unabashed fan of the Tucson Folk Festival celebrated the first weekend in May. This year was their 31st annual. Five stages, 120 performers, 2 days of hand-clapping, foot-stomping, ass-shaking good times. This is where the young come to learn  a few of life’s lessons through songs both … Continue reading

Apache May: An Indian Girl On The Slaughter Ranch

This is the dress and vest Apache May wore when Sheriff John Slaughter discovered her.

“Texas” John Slaughter was the sheriff who cleaned up Cochise County after the Earp Brothers and Doc Holliday left Arizona. He was as tough as they come and, among the outlaw class, earned the moniker “that wicked little gringo”. As despised and feared as he was by the outlaws, he … Continue reading

Las Lagunas de Anza Wetlands: A Nogales Treasure

Las Lagunas de Anza

Las Lagunas is a lush Natural Wetlands smack dab off the I-19 Freeway just 8 miles from the Mexican border. Several weeks ago, a fellow by the name of Don Clemans contacted us at Southern Arizona Guide, wanting to know how he could get into the Best Birding Spots in … Continue reading

Exploring the Millville Ruins with the FSPR

Millville Ruins

Ever since Jim and I have been travelling to and from Tombstone I have been curious about the Millville Ruins, stone structures outside of Tombstone about 8 miles. They sit on the side of a hill facing the San Pedro River to the west as it meanders northward. My opportunity to … Continue reading

A Stroll Through St. Anthony’s Monastery!

The Abbott's home overlooking St. Anthony's Greek Orthodox Monastery.

Florence Arizona is about 75 miles NE of Tucson on Highway 79. Saint Anthony’s Greek Orthodox Monastery is on the way from Tucson to Florence. We had wanted to visit this monastery for years, but each time we were at or near Florence, we did not have the proper attire. … Continue reading

The Ghost Town Tour You Should Not Have Missed!

Southern Arizona Guide Ghost Town Tour at Pearce AZ

Our Ghost Town Tour leaves from Costco parking lot at I-10 & Kino Parkway at 8 AM. Usually, we go mid-week. It takes about an hour & a half to get to our first ghost town, Pearce, Arizona. Upon arrival at the Old Pearce Jail, Anna Nickell, head of the … Continue reading

The Camp Grant Massacre: Part II, The Outcome

Camp Grant Parade Grounds

How Tucson’s Wealthiest & Most Prominent Civic Leaders Committed Mass Murder & Got Away With It. If you have not read the Circumstances Leading up to the Massacre, you can find it here. Fear, Anger, and Greed In Tucson Some seventy miles south in the small, dusty, predominantly Mexican town … Continue reading

A Fate Worse Than Death: How Pennington Street Got Its Name!

Larcena Ann Pennington

How did Pennington Street in Downtown Tucson get its name? (a) Could it be named for some 19th century politician and merchant like Estevan Ochoa, who established a successful business supplying Indian reservations and U.S. Army forts northeast of Tucson? He served as mayor (1875-76) and has a downtown street … Continue reading