Big Sycamore Stands Alone: A Book Review

Aravaipa Canyon

The full title is Big Sycamore Stands Alone: The Western Apaches, Aravaipa, and the Struggle For Place. I was instantly drawn to it because, according to the book’s jacket, it promised to reveal a new and in depth understanding of a proud people who once inhabited all of a large, rugged landscape the Western (aka San Carlos) Apaches call Arapa, a place that has great meaning for them still.

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Powerful Apache Warrior Women: Lozen & Dahteste

Lozen

In the late 1870’s, to engineer the official Indian policy of “concentration”, the United States government forced Victorio and his band of Warm Springs Chiricahua Apaches to move from the land they held sacred in New Mexico to the dreaded San Carlos Reservation about 35 miles east of Globe, AZ … Continue reading

Adventures In Apache Country: An (1864) Tour Through Arizona

Tucson Arizona Territory ca. 1864.

In the 1850’s, Southern Arizona was undeveloped. Tucson was a small, dirty Mexican village with perhaps 300 poor souls. The Spanish abandoned their Presidio at Tubac because of relentless Apache attacks and had established El Presidio de Tucson in 1775. The Mexicans had taken over the fort following Mexico’s independence … Continue reading

Fort Bayard, New Mexico: A Splendid History!

Fort Bayard New Mexico

Fort Bayard very near Silver City, New Mexico was one of many forts established by the U.S. Army to subdue the Apaches who threatened both Anglo-American and Mexican-American settlers, their crops and their herds. To be more specific, Fort Bayard was created by Company B of the 125th U.S. Colored … Continue reading

Steins: A Ghost Town With Stories To Tell

Steins ghost town New Mexico

Steins (pronounced Steens) is a New Mexico ghost town. It is easy to get to. Driving east from Tucson, stay on the I-10 for a few minutes past the New Mexico border and take the Steins off ramp. What remains of the town is on the north side of the … Continue reading

Pinos Altos: A New Mexico Ghost Town

Pinos Altos Opera House

May 2016. One of our day trips while staying in Silver City New Mexico was to the once thriving mining town of Pinos Altos (Spanish for Tall Pines). In 1860, three prospectors stopped for a drink at Bear Creek 7 miles north of Silver City and discovered gold. Soon, 700 … Continue reading

Silver City, New Mexico: A Walk About Town!

Silver City Overview

Silver City was a mining town, as were most early towns in Southern Arizona and New Mexico. In fact, Silver City most resembles Bisbee, Arizona. Both were built on hills over 5,000′ elevation. Both have many stately structures built in the late 19th and early 20th century. Both now have … Continue reading

Apaches Attack A Stagecoach; Passenger and Driver Murdered!

Apache Chief Nana

Arizona Weekly Citizen: August 7, 1881 Back in the 1860’s to 1880’s, the terrorist threat to Anglo and Mexican Tucsonans was local and ever-present. Only back then, they weren’t called “terrorists”. They were called “Apaches”. Click on the picture to enlarge the article. Background to the Article In the 19th … Continue reading

Apache May: An Indian Girl On The Slaughter Ranch

This is the dress and vest Apache May wore when Sheriff John Slaughter discovered her.

“Texas” John Slaughter was the sheriff who cleaned up Cochise County after the Earp Brothers and Doc Holliday left Arizona. He was as tough as they come and, among the outlaw class, earned the moniker “that wicked little gringo”. As despised and feared as he was by the outlaws, he … Continue reading