The Death Of Cochise

Cochise Stronghold

Part IV – This is the fourth in our series about the great Chiricahua chief, Cochise, and his role in the fascinating history of Southern Arizona. On October 30, 1876, President U.S. Grant signed an executive order unilaterally dissolving the Chiricahua Apache Indian Reservation in present-day Cochise County, in the far … Continue reading

Cochise and the Battles of Dragoon Springs and Apache Pass

Painting of the Battle of Apache Pass by Joe Beler

Part II – This is the second in a series on the great Chiricahua Chief, Cochise, and his part in the fascinating history of Southern Arizona. For the First Part in the series, Please see the post on Cochise Becomes a “Reservation Indian”. Confederate Soldiers Occupy Tucson In February 1862, … Continue reading

Autumn Fest 2014 To Celebrate Apache Culture

Apache Brothers

AMERIND AUTUMN FEST 2014 CELEBRATES APACHE CULTURE The Amerind Museum is one of Southern Arizona Guide’s favorite attractions. It is located in beautiful Texas Canyon and will hold its Annual Autumn Fest October 18, 2014. The day-long event will celebrate the culture of the Apache Native people with food, family … Continue reading

Apaches Attack A Stagecoach; Passenger and Driver Murdered!

Apache Chief Nana

Arizona Weekly Citizen: August 7, 1881 Back in the 1860’s to 1880’s, the terrorist threat to Anglo and Mexican Tucsonans was local and ever-present. Only back then, they weren’t called “terrorists”. They were called “Apaches”. Background to the Article In the 19th century, the little town of Tucson was surrounded … Continue reading

Big Sycamore Stands Alone: A Book Review

Aravaipa Canyon

The full title is Big Sycamore Stands Alone: The Western Apaches, Aravaipa, and the Struggle For Place. I was instantly drawn to it because, according to the book’s jacket, it promised to reveal a new and in depth understanding of a proud people who once inhabited all of a large, rugged landscape the Western (aka San Carlos) Apaches call Arapa, a place that has great meaning for them still.

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Apache May: An Indian Girl On The Slaughter Ranch

This is the dress and vest Apache May wore when Sheriff John Slaughter discovered her.

“Texas” John Slaughter was the sheriff who cleaned up Cochise County after the Earp Brothers and Doc Holliday left Arizona. He was as tough as they come and, among the outlaw class, earned the moniker “that wicked little gringo”. As despised and feared as he was by the outlaws, he … Continue reading

Tom Jeffords and the Chiricahua Apache Reservation

Tom Jeffords. Photo taken in 1885.

Editor’s Note. Karen Weston Gonzales is a talented free lance writer. I first read her story about Southern Arizona pioneer, Tom Jeffords, in Tombstone Times to which I subscribe. The story is reprinted here with permission. The story is true and offers a clear account of one of the most … Continue reading