Tom Jeffords and the Chiricahua Apache Reservation

Tom Jeffords. Photo taken in 1885.

Editor’s Note. Karen Weston Gonzales is a talented free lance writer. I first read her story about Southern Arizona pioneer, Tom Jeffords, in Tombstone Times to which I subscribe. The story is reprinted here with permission. The story is true and offers a clear account of one of the most … Continue reading

Fort Bowie, Arizona Territory: 1862 – 1894. A Pictorial

Ruins of Fort Bowie, Arizona.

For a quarter century, 1861 to 1886, Ft. Bowie was prime real estate known as Apache Pass. The Americans wanted it for their stagecoaches & supply wagons. The Chiricahua Apaches wanted it because their people had lived here for at least two centuries. Both sides were willing to pay for it in blood.

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The Curious Case Of Mickey Free

Mickey Free and Scouts

(Editor’s note: A few weeks ago, Tim Simmons, one of our readers wrote to ask if we would write about Mickey Free. Mr. Simmons explained that Mickey was a Mexican fighting alongside the White Mountain Apaches against other Apaches for the Americans. We thought that was certainly unusual and that … Continue reading

The Death Of Chiricahua Chief Cochise

Cochise Stronghold

Part IV – This is the fourth in our series about the great Chiricahua chief, Cochise, and his role in the fascinating history of Southern Arizona. Here is Part One. Cochise becomes a “Reservation Indian.” On October 30, 1876, President U.S. Grant signed an executive order unilaterally dissolving the Chiricahua Apache … Continue reading

Cochise and the Battles of Dragoon Springs and Apache Pass

Painting of the Battle of Apache Pass by Joe Beler

Part II – This is the second in a series on the great Chiricahua Chief, Cochise, and his part in the fascinating history of Southern Arizona. For the First Part in the series, Please see the post on Cochise Becomes a “Reservation Indian”. Confederate Soldiers Occupy Tucson In February 1862, … Continue reading

The Wrath of Cochise, by Terry Mort: A Book Review

General George Armstrong Custer

Most Americans know at least a little about Custer’s Last Stand, also known as the Battle of the Little Bighorn. The incident has an epic quality worthy of Homer’s Illiad or Virgil’s Aeneid. The battle took place on June 25th & 26th, 1876 between the combined forces of the Lakoda, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho tribes […]

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