Apache May: An Indian Girl On The Slaughter Ranch

This is the dress and vest Apache May wore when Sheriff John Slaughter discovered her.

“Texas” John Slaughter was the sheriff who cleaned up Cochise County after the Earp Brothers and Doc Holliday left Arizona. He was as tough as they come and, among the outlaw class, earned the moniker “that wicked little gringo”. As despised and feared as he was by the outlaws, he … Continue reading

Tom Jeffords and the Chiricahua Apache Reservation

Tom Jeffords. Photo taken in 1885.

Editor’s Note. Karen Weston Gonzales is a talented free lance writer. I first read her story about Southern Arizona pioneer, Tom Jeffords, in Tombstone Times to which I subscribe. The story is reprinted here with permission. The story is true and offers a clear account of one of the most … Continue reading

Coronado National Memorial: A Video

Coronado National Memorial

In this video, Mike Foster talks about the Coronado National Memorial and the Coronado Expedition for which this memorial is named. This is a great Day Trip for a warm day. Bring a picnic for the top of Montezuma Pass at 6500 ft. elevation. Explore the cave on the property. … Continue reading

Fort Bowie, Arizona Territory: 1862 – 1894. A Pictorial.

Ruins of Fort Bowie, Arizona.

For a quarter century, 1861 to 1886, Ft. Bowie was prime real estate known as Apache Pass. The Americans wanted it for their stagecoaches & supply wagons. The Chiricahua Apaches wanted it because their people had lived here for at least two centuries. Both sides were willing to pay for it in blood.

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Send Some Apaches To New York. That’ll Show ‘Em!

Chiricahua Apaches 1886

Like so many others, I enjoy local histories. Understanding history is how I get a sense of the places and people I visit as I travel around Baja Arizona creating my videos, photographs, stories, and reviews to share with you on my Southern Arizona Guide. Of late, I have been reading extensively about the Apache [...]

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Map of Apache Country

(A) Fort Lowell in east Tucson. (B) Fort Bowie. (C) Cochise Stronghold. (D) Chiricahua National Monument. (E) Fort Huachuca.
View main Apache Wars article here:
Read the Apache Wars sequence of events in the following article.
A couple of places to dine and overnight in Southeastern Arizona are:

Apache-history_115For more information on the Apaches and the history surrounding the Apache Wars, see our page on the Local History of the Apaches.