Tom Jeffords and the Chiricahua Apache Reservation

Tom Jeffords. Photo taken in 1885.

Editor’s Note. Karen Weston Gonzales is a talented free lance writer. I first read her story about Southern Arizona pioneer, Tom Jeffords, in Tombstone Times to which I subscribe. The story is reprinted here with permission. The story is true and offers a clear account of one of the most … Continue reading

Fort Bowie, Arizona Territory: 1862 – 1894. A Pictorial

Ruins of Fort Bowie, Arizona.

For a quarter century, 1861 to 1886, Ft. Bowie was prime real estate known as Apache Pass. The Americans wanted it for their stagecoaches & supply wagons. The Chiricahua Apaches wanted it because their people had lived here for at least two centuries. Both sides were willing to pay for it in blood.

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Who Killed Johnny Ringo?

Johnny Ringo's Grave

Almost everything we “know” about the outlaw gunman Johnny Ringo is either factually inaccurate, unsubstantiated hearsay, or intentional embellishment by authors to sell their books and magazine articles. Here is what we know with a reasonable degree of certitude. We know he was born in Indiana in 1850 and died … Continue reading

Fort Bayard, New Mexico: A Splendid History!

Fort Bayard New Mexico

Fort Bayard very near Silver City, New Mexico was one of many forts established by the U.S. Army to subdue the Apaches who threatened both Anglo-American and Mexican-American settlers, their crops and their herds. To be more specific, Fort Bayard was created by Company B of the 125th U.S. Colored … Continue reading

Silver City, New Mexico: A Walk About Town!

Silver City Overview

Silver City was a mining town, as were most early towns in Southern Arizona and New Mexico. In fact, Silver City most resembles Bisbee, Arizona. Both were built on hills over 5,000′ elevation. Both have many stately structures built in the late 19th and early 20th century. Both now have … Continue reading

Apache May: An Indian Girl On The Slaughter Ranch

This is the dress and vest Apache May wore when Sheriff John Slaughter discovered her.

“Texas” John Slaughter was the sheriff who cleaned up Cochise County after the Earp Brothers and Doc Holliday left Arizona. He was as tough as they come and, among the outlaw class, earned the moniker “that wicked little gringo”. As despised and feared as he was by the outlaws, he … Continue reading

The Camp Grant Massacre: Part II, The Outcome

Camp Grant Parade Grounds

How Tucson’s Wealthiest & Most Prominent Civic Leaders Committed Mass Murder & Got Away With It. If you have not read the Circumstances Leading up to the Massacre, you can find it here. Fear, Anger, and Greed In Tucson Some seventy miles south in the small, dusty, predominantly Mexican town … Continue reading