Send Some Apaches To New York. That’ll Show ‘Em!

Chiricahua Apaches 1886

Like so many others, I enjoy local histories. Understanding history is how I get a sense of the places and people I visit as I travel around Baja Arizona creating my videos, photographs, stories, and reviews to share with you on my Southern Arizona Guide. Of late, I have been reading extensively about the Apache […]

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Camp Grant Massacre: A Strange Epilogue

Chief Eskiminzin

Having read our stories about the Camp Grant Massacre and the trial of those Tucson citizens accused of this mass murder, you might find this brief follow-up note of interest. Following their acquittal, the leaders of the mob were rewarded with paying public positions. William Oury was elected city alderman; … Continue reading

Guided Tours of Tucson and Southern Arizona

Santa Cruz River Valley Tour at Tumacacori

Click HERE for schedule of upcoming tours and ticket purchases. What People Are Saying About Our Guided Tours Jim, I want to take a moment to thank you on behalf of all five of us. We really enjoyed being a part of the first wine tasting tour that you and … Continue reading

In Their Own Words: Cochise & The People Who Knew Him!

West Side of Dragoon Mountains

Unlike the many images we have of Geronimo today, no photograph of Cochise exists. We only know what he looked like from contemporary written accounts; mostly American and Mexican. These we owe to the very few people of European descent who lived to tell about their close encounter with the … Continue reading

An Adventure To Council Rocks Near Cochise Stronghold!

West Side of Cochise Stronghold

Southern Arizona is peppered with places of major historical importance. Many are, in one way or another, related to the Apache Wars that raged throughout Southern Arizona from 1861 to 1886. In terms of historical significance, I can’t think of any place more important than Council Rocks, the most likely … Continue reading

Apache May: An Indian Girl On The Slaughter Ranch

This is the dress and vest Apache May wore when Sheriff John Slaughter discovered her.

“Texas” John Slaughter was the sheriff who cleaned up Cochise County after the Earp Brothers and Doc Holliday left Arizona. He was as tough as they come and, among the outlaw class, earned the moniker “that wicked little gringo”. As despised and feared as he was by the outlaws, he … Continue reading

Tom Jeffords and the Chiricahua Apache Reservation

Tom Jeffords. Photo taken in 1885.

Editor’s Note. Karen Weston Gonzales is a talented free lance writer. I first read her story about Southern Arizona pioneer, Tom Jeffords, in Tombstone Times to which I subscribe. The story is reprinted here with permission. The story is true and offers a clear account of one of the most … Continue reading