Historic Downtown Tucson: A Collection of Picture Postcards

Tucson, Arizona: 2013.

As a “city”, Tucson really came into its own in the first decade of the 20th century, even though the city was legally incorporated in 1877. It never amounted to anything of importance until the Southern Pacific Railroad arrived in 1880. The railroad connected Tucson to the outside world. It brought hardware, lumber, and fresh produce at affordable prices. Even today, you can see how the architecture of the city changed after the arrival of the railroad. 

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Summer on the Mountains. Stay Cool!

Butterfly Trail

Mount Lemmon School may have started in some areas already, but there is still plenty of summer left to cool off atop Mt. Lemmon. Mt. Lemmon is a 365 day vacation getaway. Snow in the winter and a cool respite from the sweltering desert heat in the summer. Those of … Continue reading

The Train To Tombstone: Arizona Territory, 1903.

Tombstone Train 1903

TOMBSTONE’S RAILROAD CENTENNIAL reprinted with permission from Tombstone Times. by Larry Jensen & Ray Madzia Picture the day. Feel the event. The Railroad was coming to Tombstone!!!! It had been nearly 25 years that folks had been arriving in Tombstone, but not by rail. The railroad had not laid tracks … Continue reading

Dakota Cafe: A Dining Review

Dakota Cafe Front

It was a hot July Sunday, barely afternoon, when Ms. Karen & I took off on one of our adventures. We usually do a Sunday day-trip, but we got a late start and this would have to be a half-day trip. We headed for the wilds of East Tucson, a … Continue reading

Who Killed Johnny Ringo?

Johnny Ringo's Grave

Almost everything we “know” about the outlaw gunman Johnny Ringo is either factually inaccurate, unsubstantiated hearsay, or intentional embellishment by authors to sell their books and magazine articles. Here is what we know with a reasonable degree of certitude. We know he was born in Indiana in 1850 and died … Continue reading

Fort Bayard, New Mexico: A Splendid History!

Fort Bayard New Mexico

Fort Bayard very near Silver City, New Mexico was one of many forts established by the U.S. Army to subdue the Apaches who threatened both Anglo-American and Mexican-American settlers, their crops and their herds. To be more specific, Fort Bayard was created by Company B of the 125th U.S. Colored … Continue reading

Steins: A Ghost Town With Stories To Tell

Steins ghost town New Mexico

Steins (pronounced Steens) is a New Mexico ghost town. It is easy to get to. Driving east from Tucson, stay on the I-10 for a few minutes past the New Mexico border and take the Steins off ramp. What remains of the town is on the north side of the … Continue reading

Pinos Altos: A New Mexico Ghost Town

Pinos Altos Opera House

May 2016. One of our day trips while staying in Silver City New Mexico was to the once thriving mining town of Pinos Altos (Spanish for Tall Pines). In 1860, three prospectors stopped for a drink at Bear Creek 7 miles north of Silver City and discovered gold. Soon, 700 … Continue reading