The Wrath of Cochise, by Terry Mort: A Book Review

General George Armstrong Custer

Most Americans know at least a little about Custer’s Last Stand, also known as the Battle of the Little Bighorn. The incident has an epic quality worthy of Homer’s Illiad or Virgil’s Aeneid. The battle took place on June 25th & 26th, 1876 between the combined forces of the Lakoda, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho tribes […]

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Historic Southern Arizona Ranches You Should Visit

San Rafael Ranch

If you enjoy time-traveling as much as we do, we suggest you visit some of Southern Arizona’s ranches that have been preserved. They date from our state’s Territorial Period (1863 – 1912). Here are a few of our favorite ranches. Some are owned by the State of Arizona. Some are … Continue reading

Fray Marcos Monument in Lochiel, a Ghost Town

Fray Marcos

Lochiel, now a ghost town, is a former border crossing town, 1.5 miles from the Santa Cruz River in the San Rafael Valley in South Central Arizona. A few structures and residents remain including a restored one room schoolhouse built around 1905. It is also the site of a monument built … Continue reading

John Clum: The Only Man To Ever Capture Geronimo!

Wyatt Earp; John Clum. Alaska 1920's.

John Clum became one of those legendary characters from Tombstone’s infamous past. His life before Tombstone is just as interesting, but that story is known only to a few. He was born in upstate New York in 1851 and attended a military academy before enrolling at Rutgers College where he … Continue reading

The Train To Tombstone: Arizona Territory, 1903.

Tombstone Train 1903

TOMBSTONE’S RAILROAD CENTENNIAL reprinted with permission from Tombstone Times. by Larry Jensen & Ray Madzia Picture the day. Feel the event. The Railroad was coming to Tombstone!!!! It had been nearly 25 years that folks had been arriving in Tombstone, but not by rail. The railroad had not laid tracks … Continue reading

Tombstone: The Town Too Tough To Die Almost Did


By the 1930’s, Tombstone was dying. The mining boomtown of the 1880’s was long gone. In 1882, Tombstone residents numbered between 6,000 and 7,000. By the time these photographs were taken, the nation was deep in the Great Depression, and Tombstone was almost a ghost town.

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