Walk the Turquoise Trail

mural on wall of Presidio San Agustin de Tucson

Many long time Tucsonan’s have not heard of the Turquoise Trail in downtown Tucson where you can explore Tucson’s historical landmarks on a self-guided walking tour. The 2.5-mile trail takes you to 23 sites, including Hotel Congress, Armory Park, the Pima County Courthouse, and Fox Tucson Theatre. A turquoise-colored line … Continue reading

Colonel William C. Greene and a Death in the Family

William Cornell Greene

William C. Greene was born in Wisconsin in 1852 (or maybe 53). Greene spent his most productive years in Sonora, Mexico. However, we can reasonably conclude that, between 1890 and 1910, he was one of the richest and most influential men in Cochise County, Arizona Territory. Most folks referred to … Continue reading

Historic Downtown Tucson: A Collection of Picture Postcards

Tucson, Arizona: 2013.

As a “city”, Tucson really came into its own in the first decade of the 20th century, even though the city was legally incorporated in 1877. It never amounted to anything of importance until the Southern Pacific Railroad arrived in 1880. The railroad connected Tucson to the outside world. It brought hardware, lumber, and fresh produce at affordable prices. Even today, you can see how the architecture of the city changed after the arrival of the railroad. 

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The Devastating Southern Arizona Earthquake of 1887

An adobe home destroyed by the 1887 earthquake just south of Douglas in Sonor

  Editor’s Note: at the time of the devastating Southern Arizona Earthquake of 1887, there were only about 90,000 people living in all of Arizona Territory. The following account was written by Henry Bethea for The Copper Chronicles, a joint project of the Bisbee Mining & Historical Museum & Bisbee’s … Continue reading

Historic Southern Arizona Ranches You Should Visit

San Rafael Ranch

If you enjoy time-traveling as much as we do, we suggest you visit some of Southern Arizona’s ranches that have been preserved. They date from our state’s Territorial Period (1863 – 1912). Here are a few of our favorite ranches. Some are owned by the State of Arizona. Some are … Continue reading

Fray Marcos Monument in Lochiel, a Ghost Town

Fray Marcos

Lochiel, now a ghost town, is a former border crossing town, 1.5 miles from the Santa Cruz River in the San Rafael Valley in South Central Arizona. A few structures and residents remain including a restored one room schoolhouse built around 1905. It is also the site of a monument built … Continue reading

How John Clum Became The Only Man To Capture Geronimo!

Wyatt Earp; John Clum. Alaska 1920's.

John Philip Clum was born in upstate New York in 1851 and attended a military academy before enrolling at Rutgers College where he began a classical education: Latin, Greek, Mathematics, Natural History and Rhetoric. Lacking sufficient funds to continue his formal education, he dropped out of college in his second … Continue reading

Summer on the Mountains. Stay Cool!

Butterfly Trail

Mount Lemmon School may have started in some areas already, but there is still plenty of summer left to cool off atop Mt. Lemmon. Mt. Lemmon is a 365 day vacation getaway. Snow in the winter and a cool respite from the sweltering desert heat in the summer. Those of … Continue reading

Charro Steak: Just How Good is it?

Entry Bar: Charro Steak Downtown Tucson

Charro Steak opened in Downtown Tucson in April 2016. I dined there soon after with Julie, the new marketing director at the venerable Rialto Theater. Charro Steak is the offspring of El Charro Café, the legendary Mexican restaurant on Court Street made famous by Chef Carlotta Flores. Opening in 1922, … Continue reading