The Second Anza Expedition: Journey of a Lifetime!

Anza at Tubac Presidio

In 1775, along the East Coast of North America between what would become the states of New Hampshire and Georgia, America’s founding fathers were busy fomenting rebellion against the King of England, ruler of the 18th century’s global superpower. In the Western region of the North American continent, what is … Continue reading

Historic Downtown Tucson: A Collection of Picture Postcards

Tucson, Arizona: 2013.

As a “city”, Tucson really came into its own in the first decade of the 20th century, even though the city was legally incorporated in 1877. It never amounted to anything of importance until the Southern Pacific Railroad arrived in 1880. The railroad connected Tucson to the outside world. It brought hardware, lumber, and fresh produce at affordable prices. Even today, you can see how the architecture of the city changed after the arrival of the railroad. 

Continue reading

Apaches Attack A Stagecoach; Passenger and Driver Murdered!

Apache Chief Nana

Arizona Weekly Citizen: August 7, 1881 Back in the 1860’s to 1880’s, the terrorist threat to Anglo and Mexican Tucsonans was local and ever-present. Only back then, they weren’t called “terrorists”. They were called “Apaches”. Click on the picture to enlarge the article. Background to the Article In the 19th … Continue reading

Look to the Mountains: A History of Mt. Lemmon

Rose Canyon Lake on the way to Summerhaven and Ski Valley near the summit of Mt. Lemmon.

I found this book on the history of Mt. Lemmon at the Palisades Ranger Station on Mt. Lemmon last summer and have been trying to get time to read it ever since. The complete title is: Look to the Mountains: An in-depth look into the lives and times of the people … Continue reading

The Camp Grant Massacre: Part II, The Outcome

Camp Grant Parade Grounds

How Tucson’s Wealthiest & Most Prominent Civic Leaders Committed Mass Murder & Got Away With It. If you have not read the Circumstances Leading up to the Massacre, you can find it here. Fear, Anger, and Greed In Tucson Some seventy miles south in the small, dusty, predominantly Mexican town … Continue reading

A Fate Worse Than Death: How Pennington Street Got Its Name!

Larcena Ann Pennington

How did Pennington Street in Downtown Tucson get its name? (a) Could Pennington Street be named for some 19th century politician and merchant like Estevan Ochoa, who established a successful business supplying Indian reservations and U.S. Army forts northeast of Tucson? He served as mayor (1875-76) and has a downtown … Continue reading

Tucson’s Vintage Neon Signs: Part II

Crescent Tobacco Neon Sign

if you have not read Part I of our Neon Signs Story, please start here. Driving South on Oracle and turning left onto Drachman, you quickly see several mid-20th century motor courts. All are long past their prime. However, some of their old neon signs have been refurbished and shine … Continue reading