The Death Of Cochise

Cochise Stronghold

Part IV – This is the fourth in our series about the great Chiricahua chief, Cochise, and his role in the fascinating history of Southern Arizona. On October 30, 1876, President U.S. Grant signed an executive order unilaterally dissolving the Chiricahua Apache Indian Reservation in present-day Cochise County, in the far … Continue reading

Cochise and the Battles of Dragoon Springs and Apache Pass

Painting of the Battle of Apache Pass by Joe Beler

Part II – This is the second in a series on the great Chiricahua Chief, Cochise, and his part in the fascinating history of Southern Arizona. For the First Part in the series, Please see the post on Cochise Becomes a “Reservation Indian”. Confederate Soldiers Occupy Tucson In February 1862, … Continue reading

Ghost Town Trail: A Day Trip From Tucson!

Pearce General Store

Shopping at a mall on Black Friday is not for us. Instead, we took our granddaughter, Jessie, and her fiance, Corey, who are visiting from California, to the wide-open spaces of Southeastern Arizona in search of ghost towns along Ghost Town Trail. We left Tucson at 9:30 AM and were … Continue reading

Apache May: An Indian Girl On The Slaughter Ranch

This is the dress and vest Apache May wore when Sheriff John Slaughter discovered her.

“Texas” John Slaughter was the sheriff who cleaned up Cochise County after the Earp Brothers and Doc Holliday left Arizona. He was as tough as they come and, among the outlaw class, earned the moniker “that wicked little gringo”. As despised and feared as he was by the outlaws, he … Continue reading

Tom Jeffords and the Chiricahua Apache Reservation

Tom Jeffords. Photo taken in 1885.

Editor’s Note. Karen Weston Gonzales is a talented free lance writer. I first read her story about Southern Arizona pioneer, Tom Jeffords, in Tombstone Times to which I subscribe. The story is reprinted here with permission. The story is true and offers a clear account of one of the most … Continue reading

The Sobaipuri Culture: Ancestral Indians

Sobaipuri

Where did the Sobaipuri come from? When did they inhabit the San Pedro River Valley? Where did they disappear to? In this short video, Mike Foster takes a look at these questions and more. For a more in depth look at the Sobaipuri, see “The Sobaipuri and their Descendants”,another educational … Continue reading