The Death Of Chiricahua Chief Cochise

Cochise Stronghold

Part IV – This is the fourth in our series about the great Chiricahua chief, Cochise, and his role in the fascinating history of Southern Arizona. Here is Part One. Cochise becomes a “Reservation Indian.” On October 30, 1876, President U.S. Grant signed an executive order unilaterally dissolving the Chiricahua Apache … Continue reading

Cochise and the Battles of Dragoon Springs and Apache Pass

Painting of the Battle of Apache Pass by Joe Beler

Part II – This is the second in a series on the great Chiricahua Chief, Cochise, and his part in the fascinating history of Southern Arizona. For the First Part in the series, Please see the post on Cochise Becomes a “Reservation Indian”. Confederate Soldiers Occupy Tucson In February 1862, … Continue reading

The Wrath of Cochise, by Terry Mort: A Book Review

General George Armstrong Custer

Most Americans know at least a little about Custer’s Last Stand, also known as the Battle of the Little Bighorn. The incident has an epic quality worthy of Homer’s Illiad or Virgil’s Aeneid. The battle took place on June 25th & 26th, 1876 between the combined forces of the Lakoda, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho tribes […]

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Colonel William C. Greene and a Death in the Family

William Cornell Greene

William C. Greene was born in Wisconsin in 1852 (or maybe 53). Greene spent his most productive years in Sonora, Mexico. However, we can reasonably conclude that, between 1890 and 1910, he was one of the richest and most influential men in Cochise County, Arizona Territory. Most folks referred to … Continue reading

Fray Marcos Monument in Lochiel, a Ghost Town

Fray Marcos

Lochiel, now a ghost town, is a former border crossing town, 1.5 miles from the Santa Cruz River in the San Rafael Valley in South Central Arizona. A few structures and residents remain including a restored one room schoolhouse built around 1905. It is also the site of a monument built … Continue reading

Powerful Apache Warrior Women: Lozen & Dahteste


In the late 1870’s, to engineer the official Indian policy of “concentration”, the United States government forced Victorio and his band of Warm Springs Chiricahua Apaches to move from the land they held sacred in New Mexico to the dreaded San Carlos Reservation about 35 miles east of Globe, AZ … Continue reading

Who Killed Johnny Ringo?

Johnny Ringo's Grave

Almost everything we “know” about the outlaw gunman Johnny Ringo is either factually inaccurate, unsubstantiated hearsay, or intentional embellishment by authors to sell their books and magazine articles. Here is what we know with a reasonable degree of certitude. We know he was born in Indiana in 1850 and died … Continue reading

Apache May: An Indian Girl On The Slaughter Ranch

This is the dress and vest Apache May wore when Sheriff John Slaughter discovered her.

“Texas” John Slaughter was the sheriff who cleaned up Cochise County after the Earp Brothers and Doc Holliday left Arizona. He was as tough as they come and, among the outlaw class, earned the moniker “that wicked little gringo”. As despised and feared as he was by the outlaws, he … Continue reading