Apache May: An Indian Girl On The Slaughter Ranch

This is the dress and vest Apache May wore when Sheriff John Slaughter discovered her.

“Texas” John Slaughter was the sheriff who cleaned up Cochise County after the Earp Brothers and Doc Holliday left Arizona. He was as tough as they come and, among the outlaw class, earned the moniker “that wicked little gringo”. As despised and feared as he was by the outlaws, he … Continue reading

Tom Jeffords and the Chiricahua Apache Reservation

Tom Jeffords. Photo taken in 1885.

Editor’s Note. Karen Weston Gonzales is a talented free lance writer. I first read her story about Southern Arizona pioneer, Tom Jeffords, in Tombstone Times to which I subscribe. The story is reprinted here with permission. The story is true and offers a clear account of one of the most … Continue reading

The Sobaipuri Culture: Ancestral Indians

Sobaipuri

Where did the Sobaipuri come from? When did they inhabit the San Pedro River Valley? Where did they disappear to? In this short video, Mike Foster takes a look at these questions and more. For a more in depth look at the Sobaipuri, see “The Sobaipuri and their Descendants“,another educational … Continue reading

Cochise Culture

Cochise Culture

The Friends of the San Pedro River are celebrating Archaeology month by offering a new Archaeology walk every Saturday in March at 9am. The Murray Spring Mammoth Kill site hike on March 8, 2014 will meet at the Murray Springs Parking Area off Moson Road. Learn more about this important … Continue reading

America’s Longest War: An Apache History!

Apaches

Which was America’s longest war? President Obama claims that the war in Afghanistan is America’s longest. But is that true? First, let me say that “wars” no longer start with a formal “declaration of war” nor end with a formal signing of surrender documents or “peace accords”. So part of … Continue reading

Fort Bowie, Arizona Territory: 1862 – 1894. A Pictorial.

Ruins of Fort Bowie, Arizona.

For a quarter century, 1861 to 1886, Ft. Bowie was prime real estate known as Apache Pass. The Americans wanted it for their stagecoaches & supply wagons. The Chiricahua Apaches wanted it because their people had lived here for at least two centuries. Both sides were willing to pay for it in blood.

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The Day Amelia Earhart Dropped In For Dinner

Amelia Earhart

(Annie Larkin is one lucky lady. As curator of the Bisbee Mining & Historical Museum, she gets to hunt through old cases & drawers in this wonderful old building in search of hidden treasures, such as the story below.) In September of 1928, Amilia Earhart was one of the most … Continue reading